A Must Have For Your Fridge To Post (It May Save Your Life)


Have you ever wondered how long you can keep certain foods safely?  Well Chow just did an article on this and here are the answers for you.

 

[via Foodbeast]

shelflifewhole

This is a must have for every home to keep it safe.  My hubby and I are horrible about stocking up then forgetting to check the expiration dates.  Since it is just the two of us we do not use products as quickly as most people.  Our milk is a great example of this.  We go through streaks where we use a lot then other times we hardly use any at all.  This can prove to be embarrassing when you have company and they want real milk for their coffee.

That was when I came to realize that I had to start checking my fridge for expiration dates. We had just opened a ketchup and it had expired a year prior.  That was a scary fact.  I did a deep cleansing of the fridge which looks like a bachelor lives here now but we are safe.

The article in Chow that I was reading was from http://www.chow.com/food-news/135542/how-long-can-you-keep-foods-before-they-go-bad/

If you are even in doubt there is an entire website set up with answers for just about anything on the market that you could ask about in various categories:  http://www.stilltasty.com/

Sturdy Staples: 9 Foods That Can Outlast You

 

You’ve just gotten halfway through a recipe, only to discover that a key ingredient is missing because you tossed it during your last cleaning spree.

It’s a predicament you shouldn’t have to face again — at least when it comes to the nine kitchen staples we’ve listed here.

When stored properly, these everyday items will last for years — sometimes decades — even after they’ve been opened. And they’ll lose very little, if any, of their original quality as time passes. So think twice before tossing one of these items. If you’ve been handling it correctly, chances are it’s just fine.
1.     HONEY
Pure honey is as durable as it is delicious; it keeps safe indefinitely. Honey may change color or crystallize over time, but that won’t make it unsafe.
Keep it fresh: Store in a cool area and keep tightly closed. Revive crystallized honey by placing the opened jar in warm water and stirring until dissolved.
 
2.     RICE
White, wild, arborio, jasmine and basmati rice all have an indefinite shelf life, when kept free from contaminants. The exception: brown rice. Thanks to its higher oil content, it won’t keep nearly as long.
Keep it fresh: Store in a cool, dry area. Once opened, place rice in a sealed airtight container or place original package in a resealable heavy-duty freezer bag. For added protection, store rice in the refrigerator or freezer.
3.     SUGAR
White, brown or powdered — sugar never spoils because it doesn’t support bacterial growth. The real challenge is to prevent it from becoming rock-hard.
Keep it fresh: Keep sugar in a cool, dry area. To prevent sugar from hardening after opening, place it in an airtight container or cover the original package in a heavy-duty plastic bag and seal tightly.
4.     HARD LIQUOR
Whipping up some penne alla vodka and a pitcher of cocktails? Distilled spirits —vodka, rum, whiskey, gin, tequila and the like — don’t spoil, even after opening. The taste and aroma may fade gradually, but it’ll take ages before you notice.
Keep it fresh: Store in cool, dark area, away from direct heat or sunlight. Keep bottle tightly closed when not in use.
5.     MAPLE SYRUP
Pure maple syrup not only makes your pancakes special, it adds tremendous flavor to a whole range of dishes. Best of all, it keeps forever in the freezer.
Keep it fresh: Refrigerate after opening. For long-term storage, freeze maple syrup in airtight plastic containers.
Yes, it’s more expensive than its imitation counterpart. But pure vanilla extract keeps forever, so you’ll never have to waste a drop.
 
Keep it fresh: Store in cool, dark cupboard and keep tightly closed when not in use.
 
A reliable standby in everything from marinades to salad dressings, distilled white vinegar will remain virtually unchanged as the years pass by.
Keep it fresh: Store vinegar a cool, dark area and keep tightly capped after each use.
 
8.     CORNSTARCH
A must-have for thickening sauces, gravies, and puddings. Cornstarch will keep indefinitely if it’s kept dry and free from contaminants.
Keep it fresh: Store in cool, dry area; keep package tightly closed between uses.
9.     SALT
From the basic table variety to fancier versions like kosher and sea, salt is a flavor enhancer that never spoils or goes stale.
Keep it fresh: Store in cool, dry area.
Hope this helps to keep your family safe and happy.
Happy Cooking
Tammye Honey
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Corn Allergy List And Precautions


I have one in the glove compartment of car and one in my purse

Does not just come in this form sadly enough 😦

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_allergy 

Corn/Maize allergy is a type of food allergy. It can be a difficult allergy to manage, particularly in the United States, due to the high number of food products which contain various forms of corn, such as corn starch, citric acid, modified food starch, vinegar, and vanilla, among many others. [1] However, it is an allergy that often goes unrecognized.[2]

Varieties
Corn 3different types.jpg
Parts
Processing
Pathology
Corn-based products
Raw materials
Cornmeal · Mielie-meal · Nshima · Oil · Samp · Starch · Syrup
Beverages
Dishes
Corn syrup
Non-food

Foods to Avoid

Completely eliminating corn and corn products from the diet may be a challenge. Reading label ingredients and educating yourself with common corn ingredients is the best way to follow a corn-restricted diet. Avoid foods with ingredients including corn, corn meal, high fructose corn syrup, vegetable starch, maize, gum and baking powder, notes the Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters. Seek a registered dietitian for a complete list of common food ingredients with corn. These ingredients are typically found in a variety of cereals, syrups, baked goods, infant formulas and sodas. Avoid canned fruits and vegetables that contain sauces or syrups, notes the CHKD. Luncheon meats, processed cheese products, canned soups and processed breads and starches also contain many corn ingredients.

Corn Allergen List

The lists of corn products, ingredients and additives that I provide are not intended to be exhaustive, for that would be impossible to compile. There are many additives that are derived from corn that we do not know about, and often the employees of food companies do not know either. Plus, corn derivatives can be found in everything from body powder to shampoo (I’ve reacted to both)! The FDA, at this time, does not regulate corn to the extent that it does, say, peanuts, so we corn allergy sufferers are truly on our own. (Click here for a printable List in a separate browser window.)

PLEASE NOTE: In addition to the items on this list not including everything that contains corn, not everything on this list will contain corn. It is that they can contain corn, and therefore may need to be outright avoided or used cautiously. Read more about this on the Corn Allergens as Ingredients page. The items identified with an asterisk * are the most common items that might not always contain or be derived from corn. Proceed with caution!

  • Acetic acid
  • Alcohol
  • Alpha tocopherol
  • Artificial flavorings
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Ascorbates
  • Ascorbic acid
  • Aspartame (Artificial sweetener)
  • Astaxanthin
  • Baking powder
  • Barley malt* (generally OK, but can be contaminated)
  • Bleached flour*
  • Blended sugar (sugaridextrose)
  • Brown sugar* (generally OK if no caramel color)
  • Calcium citrate
  • Calcium fumarate
  • Calcium gluconate
  • Calcium lactate
  • Calcium magnesium acetate (CMA)
  • Calcium stearate
  • Calcium stearoyl lactylate
  • Caramel and caramel color
  • Carbonmethylcellulose sodium
  • Cellulose microcrystalline
  • Cellulose, methyl
  • Cellulose, powdered
  • Cetearyl glucoside
  • Choline chloride
  • Citric acid*
  • Citrus cloud emulsion (CCS)
  • Coco glycerides (cocoglycerides)
  • Confectioners sugar
  • Corn alcohol, corn gluten
  • Corn extract
  • Corn flour
  • Corn oil, corn oil margarine
  • Corn starch
  • Corn sweetener, corn sugar
  • Corn syrup, corn syrup solids
  • Corn, popcorn, cornmeal
  • Cornstarch, cornflour
  • Crosscarmellose sodium
  • Crystalline dextrose
  • Crystalline fructose
  • Cyclodextrin
  • DATUM (a dough conditioner)
  • Decyl glucoside
  • Decyl polyglucose
  • Dextrin
  • Dextrose (also found in IV solutions)
  • Dextrose anything (such as monohydrate or anhydrous)
  • d-Gluconic acid
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Drying agent
  • Erythorbic acid
  • Erythritol
  • Ethanol
  • Ethocel 20
  • Ethylcellulose
  • Ethylene
  • Ethyl acetate
  • Ethyl alcohol
  • Ethyl lactate
  • Ethyl maltol
  • Fibersol-2
  • Flavorings*
  • Food starch
  • Fructose*
  • Fruit juice concentrate*
  • Fumaric acid
  • Germ/germ meal
  • Gluconate
  • Gluconic acid
  • Glucono delta-lactone
  • Gluconolactone
  • Glucosamine
  • Glucose*
  • Glucose syrup* (also found in IV solutions)
  • Glutamate
  • Gluten
  • Gluten feed/meal
  • Glycerides
  • Glycerin*
  • Glycerol
  • Golden syrup
  • Grits
  • High fructose corn syrup
  • Hominy
  • Honey*
  • Hydrolyzed corn
  • Hydrolyzed corn protein
  • Hydrolyzed vegetable protein
  • Hydroxypropyl methylcelluhttp://www.cornallergens.com/list/corn-allergen-list.phplose
  • Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose pthalate (HPMCP)
  • Inositol
  • Invert syrup or sugar
  • Iodized salt
  • Lactate
  • Lactic acid*
  • Lauryl glucoside
  • Lecithin
  • Linoleic acid
  • Lysine
  • Magnesium citrate
  • Magnesium fumarate
  • Magnesium stearate
  • Maize
  • Malic acid
  • Malonic acid
  • Malt syrup from corn
  • Malt, malt extract
  • Maltitol
  • Maltodextrin
  • Maltol
  • Maltose
  • Mannitol
  • Methyl gluceth
  • Methyl glucose
  • Methyl glucoside
  • Methylcellulose
  • Microcrystaline cellulose
  • Modified cellulose gum
  • Modified corn starch
  • Modified food starch
  • Molasses* (corn syrup may be present; know your product)
  • Mono- and di- glycerides
  • Monosodium glutamate
  • MSG
  • Natural flavorings*
  • Olestra/Olean
  • Polenta
  • Polydextrose
  • Polylactic acid (PLA)
  • Polysorbates* (e.g. Polysorbate 80)
  • Polyvinyl acetate
  • Potassium citrate
  • Potassium fumarate
  • Potassium gluconate
  • Powdered sugar
  • Pregelatinized starch
  • Propionic acid
  • Propylene glycol*
  • Propylene glycol monostearate*
  • Saccharin
  • Salt (iodized salt)
  • Semolina (unless from wheat)
  • Simethicone
  • Sodium carboxymethylcellulose
  • Sodium citrate
  • Sodium erythorbate
  • Sodium fumarate
  • Sodium lactate
  • Sodium starch glycolate
  • Sodium stearoyl fumarate
  • Sorbate
  • Sorbic acid
  • Sorbitan* (anything)
  • Sorbitol
  • Sorghum* (not all is bad; the syrup and/or grain CAN be mixed with corn)
  • Splenda (Artificial sweetener)
  • Starch (any kind that’s not specified)
  • Stearic acid
  • Stearoyls
  • Sucralose (Artificial sweetener)
  • Sucrose
  • Sugar* (not identified as cane or beet)
  • Threonine
  • Tocopherol (vitamin E)
  • Treacle (aka golden syrup)
  • Triethyl citrate
  • Unmodified starch
  • Vanilla, natural flavoring
  • Vanilla, pure or extract
  • Vanillin
  • Vegetable anything that’s not specific*
  • Vinegar, distilled white
  • Vinyl acetate
  • Vitamin C* and Vitamin E*
  • Vitamins*
  • Xanthan gum
  • Xylitol
  • Yeast*
  • Zea mays
  • Zein

Ten Basic Steps for Corn Allergy Newbies

Corn AllergensIf you or your child have recently been diagnosed with a corn allergy or intolerance, or you suspect one, here are ten basic steps to follow:

  1. Begin by eliminating ALL of the foods/products that contain corn from your home. This sounds easier than it will be, so be patient until you get the hang of it.
  2. Get into the habit of reading labels on all foods as you buy them and again before you eat it. Print The List and carry it with you always.
  3. Keep a diary of everything you eat and of every symptom (and intensity) you experience.
  4. Find a store to shop at, such as one that sells organic foods (and remember–organic does not mean corn-free). Fill your pantry with safe foods; don’t try to keep two kinds of food in the house. That is a reaction waiting to happen!
  5. Brainstorm with the family and write up a list of your child’s or your favorite foods that CAN be eaten for each meal and for snacks. There are few things worse (especially for children) than being hungry all the time and not having anything to eat.
  6. Research the allergy more (this is just the beginning) and find a supportive community such as the Delphi Forum for Avoiding Corn. The psychological aspects of the restricted diet are far-reaching and never-ending.
  7. See a doctor for medication (but check the ingredients!) to help with the reactions; i.e., medicated creams for rashes, inhalers for asthma, or pain relievers for migraines.
  8. If you have the allergy, get a medic alert bracelet. Glucose and dextrose are found in IV solutions, and hospital personnel should be aware of your allergy in case you are not in a position to speak.
  9. Corn AllergensNever let anyone prepare food for you unless you really, really trust that person (and they have The List), and even then, double and triple check. Too many (well-intentioned) people have cooked for me, and I have had more reactions and illnesses from this than I care to think about. I get sick and they feel horrible.
  10. Keep your sense of humor and be flexible. For sure, your lifestyle will change, so adaptations are in order. Not everyone in your extended family (mostly in-laws LOL) is going to get it and you will (trust me) be questioned about this.

Over time, you will see a pattern emerge that will help you confirm if you do have an allergy/intolerance. Also, a diary will help immensely for those times you have a reaction and need to research the cause. It will also help you document the facts to your doctor, who, if you are going on suspicion, may not quite believe you!

http://www.cornallergens.com/new/basic-corn-allergy-steps.php

Now that I have bombarded you with data galore… my advice to you.  Eat at home and cook from scratch as much as possible.  I use rice flour and rice starch when cooking.  I love the Passover Holiday and stock up on the non perishable items that I can get my hands on as I know that they are Kosher for Passover which means that they are corn free.

Become aware of the symbol of Kosher for Passover, which is different than just Kosher year round…being Kosher for Passover is totally corn free.

See the P that is with the U in the Circle…that makes it for Passover…

An ‘OU-P’ indicates
The product is Pareve and Kosher for Passover as well as for year-around.

An OU-D-P indicates
Product is dairy and Kosher for Passover as well as for all year round.

An OU-M-P or an OU-Glatt-P indicates
Product is meat and Kosher for Passover as well as for all year round.

An OU-F-P indicates
Product contains Fish and Kosher for Passover as well as for all year round

http://oukosher.org/index.php/common/article/ou_symbols/

Best of Luck to you…It took me years to be diagnosed properly…Nervous stomach, start of an ulcer, goodness knows what other diagnosis I had prior…

It is not fun…I will say that when we are invited out to eat at someone’s home, I know that this sounds rude, however, I always let the hostess know of my allergy and that I am bringing a dish also for dinner that I know that I can eat.